TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter


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Daniel Coenn. Clara Erskine Clement Waters. Giovanni Bellini. Giotto and His Works.

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The Madonna in Art Illustrated. Estelle M. Opposites Attract. Bernhard Berenson. The figures are strangely tentative and childish, and only the Madonna has any personality at all, a rather sentimental one. The landscape, on the other hand, is beautiful in places, and utterly different from that of any painting known to have been made in Venice in the first decade of the 16th century. According to Vasari, then, the Barbarigo portrait was painted before the Flight into Egypt. But no one has even taken seriously the idea that Titian first painted the astonishingly assured Man with a Blue Sleeve and then the Flight.

Even if we suppose that he painted the Man with a Blue Sleeve after the Flight , the pictures are so different that they cannot be very close in date. It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that either the Man with a Blue Sleeve is not the Barbarigo portrait, and was instead painted some years later, or the Flight is not by Titian. The problem may not be evident to most visitors to the exhibition, simply because it is very hard, from the pictures on display, to gain a clear idea of what an early Titian looks like. This is a reflection of recent writing on the artist, in which the number and variety of pictures attributed to him have relentlessly increased.

The reason is not that new information has come to light, but rather that he has been credited with pictures previously assigned to other artists, or not assigned to anyone at all. In other words, scholars have become more inclined to suppose that he changed his style quite radically almost from picture to picture. One consequence of this development is that, if we accept the estimates of some authorities, Titian in his early years was far more productive than any other Venetian painter of his time, and far more productive than at any later period in his career. Another consequence is that scholars are now completely unable to put the pictures generally accepted as being by the young Titian into a chronological sequence that commands widespread agreement.

One might have supposed that connoisseurship was a rigorous kind of activity, but this is something of a misconception, especially in the case of Venetian art of the Renaissance. For reasons that are never explained, but are perhaps not difficult to guess, there is considerable kudos attached to the process of upgrading previously neglected pictures, but none at all to the process of downgrading.

Great weight is also attached to the views of experts who are not always disinterested , but much less to the evidence on which those views are based, if evidence is provided at all. And of course, despite claims of objectivity, the institutions that own paintings would be happier to believe that they are by a famous artist than by some obscure figure of whom we know nothing. The equitable division of power and the prevention of excessive concentration of power were the cornerstones of the republic. Francesco Venier had to be supported by two men every time he wanted to get up or move about.

Titian knew how to present the doge in the best possible light: In , the Apulian port of Vieste was attacked by Barbary pirates.

The doge liberated the trading post. Through the window in the portrait, we see the burning town.


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Venier solved the conflict over Vieste through diplomacy rather than warfare and showed great skill in his negotiations with Suleiman I the Magnificent , Sultan of the Ottoman Empire. The portrait presents Venier making a conciliatory gesture. The doge was unpopular with the Venetians. Despite the economic crisis, he denied himself nothing. The lavishness of his balls and banquets was the stuff of legend. The cap may strike present-day viewers as a little odd.

The culture of antiquity became the model for a new value system and a new idea of man. More than any other country, Italy was the cradle of numerous scientific discoveries and cultural innovations. For the republic of Venice, however, the sixteenth century heralded the start of its slow decline. In , the Ottoman Empire had conquered Constantinople.

Moreover, the discovery and colonisation of the Americas ushered in major geopolitical changes. European trade moved to the oceans, where Venice could not compete.

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Although Venice lost its pre-eminence as a global power, Venetian Renaissance art and culture were highly innovative. Still famous today, they exemplify Renaissance humanism, the intellectual movement that sought to revive classical learning. Humanism spread the ideal of human agency and called for scholarship and critical thinking. Self-scrutiny and self-knowledge are among the greatest achievements of the period. Artists and art theorists devised ingenious new forms of seeing and representing the visible world. Dynamic brushmarks and expressive energy — Venetian Renaissance artists developed an unmistakeable style of painting.

A breath-taking evening sky — lush colours glow in soft transitions from orange to blue. They contrast sharply with the grave-looking man dressed in sober black. In Venice, the profession of the specialist pigment seller emerged around Until then, painters called on apothecaries to supply their needs. Pigments were extracted from plants, insects and other natural materials, often sourced from far-away lands and continents.

Venice quickly established itself as the hub of the European pigment trade. Alvise dalla Scala supplied the Habsburg imperial court and the Vatican. Further to their own production, the Venetians imported Oriental textiles and yarns to manufacture the finest fabrics. The resulting garments were luxury goods that served the display of social status. The depiction of these sumptuous materials in paintings shows that patrons and artists alike understood the importance of the visual message they conveyed.

Luminosity, light effects and contrasts: Venetian painters developed a wide range of techniques in the handling of paint and colour and won great acclaim for their brilliant command of colour. No hint of parched aridity here! The scene shows Moses and the Israelites on their arduous journey to the Promised Land.

Titian: Painting the myth of Bacchus and Ariadne - National Gallery

Plagued by thirst, the people of Israel revolt against their leader. Only a miracle can save them now. Moses strikes a rock with his staff and brings forth a stream of water. Dressed in a luminous red garment, Moses stands out against the throng of people in the background.

TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter
TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter
TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter
TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter
TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter
TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter
TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter TITIAN ; a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait of the painter

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